The Legend

1. The Partnership for a New American Economy (PNAE), described by some as the most powerful and well-funded immigration lobbying firms in the U.S., is a coalition of business leaders and mayors launched by Michael Bloomberg and Rupert Murdoch to influence public opinion and policymakers toward comprehensive immigration reform. In a 2014 Wall Street Journal oped, Murdoch said that illegal immigrants who are already here should be provided a path to citizenship. Other co-chairs of the Partnershipinclude Bill Marriott (Marriott), Bob Iger (Disney), Jim McNerny (Boeing), Julian Castro (former mayor San Antonio, Secretary HUD), Michael Nutter (former mayor Philadelphia), Steve Balmer (former CEO Microsoft). PNAE invested significant resources for lobbyists and media in an effort to pass the “Gang of Eight” comprehensive immigration reform bill. PNAE will steer Gateways for Growthmoney to local governments, chambers of commerce and non-profit organizations to support “multi-sector” strategic planning for attracting, retaining, and integrating immigrants and international talent.

Governor Haslam promoted the “Gang of Eight” bill one month prior to its introduction in Congress.

2. Philadelphia transplant David Lubell first worked for Latino Memphis as a community organizer and left to start TIRRC in 2001. It is thought that TIRRC was started with funds from a U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement grant to the Nashville Chamber of Commerce for the Building the New American Community initiative, a pilot program designed to facilitate immigration and integration in non-traditional gateway cities like Nashville, Tennessee. The main focus of the initiative was to train new immigrants how to be civically engaged, (ie, take political power), by building coalitions and immigrant leadership. While at TIRRC, in 2005, Lubell launched Welcoming Tennessee.

TIRRC was namedAdvocacy Affiliate of the Yearin 2008 by the National Council of La Raza (NCLR).

3. Lubell left TIRRC in 2009 to lead the “Welcoming America” organization, the planning of which started in 2007 with funding from the Four Freedoms Fund, a group directly supported by George Soros’ Open Society Foundations (OSG). Discover the Networks says the Four Freedoms Fund was “designed to serve as a conduit through which large foundations could fund state-based open-orders organizations more flexibly and quickly. OSG has continued to fund Welcoming America.

The Four Freedoms Fund was also on the Steering Committee for the 2015 National Immigrant Integration Conference held in New York.

WA is working with ORR to help refugee resettlement agencies tamp down pockets of resistanceLubell was recently awarded the 2015 Young Global Leader award by the World Economic Forum. WA will be providing assistance to PNAE Research Funds “Gateways for Growth Challengegrant competition.

4. “Welcoming Tennessee” was planned in 2005 and launched by TIRRC in 2006. The Welcoming America report titled “Dancing to a New Tune” credits the TIRRC project as the “inspiration for all subsequent welcoming initiatives and Welcoming America.”

In 2009, TIRRC received $50,000 of J.M. Kaplan money funneled through the far left Migration Policy Institute, which J.M. Kaplam was also heavily funding. The J.M. Kaplan fund paid TIRRC to produce the “Countering the Backlash” report in early 2016. In 2015, the J.M. Kaplan Fund was on the Steering Committee for the National Immigrant Integration Conference held in New York. One of the sessions was titled, “Understanding and Addressing Today’s Organized Backlash Against Muslim Immigrants and Refugees.” Another session was titled, “Non Citizen Voting: A New Frontier for Civic Integration.”

Between 2012 – 2013, TIRRC received almost $800,000 of Soros money funneled through his front group NEO Philanthropy.

5. Nashville is among the “Welcoming Cities” in the Welcoming America network. Last year, Welcoming America paid the Nashville Chamber of Commerce for an economic “report” to support the story that legal and illegal immigrants are the hub of Nashville’s economic success. The Chamber’s “report” looks strangely just like the WA website, suggesting a WA templated product that will be replicated by Chambers in other “welcoming cities.”

6. In 2011, the Nashville Chamber of Commerce participated in a campaign with PNAE designed to help grow the PNAE membership. PNAE has published multiple reports about the immigrant population in Nashville.

7. In 2001, the Nashville Chamber of Commerce accepted a grant from the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) for a pilot project called “Building the New American Community” (BNAC). ORR was looking for non-traditional gateway cities that would serve as new places to deliver refugees. Nashville was chosen because of its economic growth and the rapid growth of foreign-born immigrants. Core principles of the BNAC project were to help the newcomers “integrate,” included building coalitions, developing refugee and immigrant leadership, and civic engagement.

8. Catholic Charities of Tennessee (CCTN) is a local affiliate of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops which is one of the nine national VOLAGs (voluntary agencies) that contract with the U.S. State Department to resettle refugees. The USCCB has approximately 213 affiliate offices that handle some aspect of refugee resettlement services. CCTN, a federal refugee resettlement contractor, operates refugee resettlement offices in Nashville and Memphis. CCTN also has a department called the Tennessee Office for Refugees, that administrates the federal refugee resettlement program, and is staffed with federal contractors that function as the State Refugee Coordinator and the State Refugee Health Coordinator.

9. PNAE and Catholic Charities served on the Steering Committee for 2015 National Immigrant Integration Conference held in New York. The 2016 Conference will be held in Nashville.

10. PNAE and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) served on the Steering Committee for 2015 National Immigrant Integration Conference held in New York. The 2016 Conference will be held in Nashville.

11. TIRRC is a named affiliate of the National Council of La Raza.

12. Renata Soto chairs the board of the National Council of La Raza.

13. Renata Soto is co-founder and Executive Director of Conexion Americas which owns the building called Casa Azafran. Described as a “community center,” it houses political organizations including TIRRC, AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council), ACO (Muslim American Center for Outreach), Justice for Our Neighbors, YWCA of Nashville & Middle Tennessee, along with a Metro Nashville Public School pre-K classroom.

14. TIRRC is headquartered in Nashville and has its office located in the building owned by Conexion Americas called Casa Azafran, where in 2014, Obama spoke about his executive action on policies designed to shield illegal immigrants from deportation.

15. Remziya Suleyman, a Kurdish Sunni Muslim refugee whose family settled in Nashville, was the policy coordinator for TIRRC from 2008 – 2011.

16. In 2012, Remziya Suleyman, a Kurdish Sunni Muslim refugee whose family settled in Nashville, founded ACO (American Center for Outreach), an organization designed to advocate for Muslims in Tennessee.

17. ACO (American Center for Outreach) coalitions with TIRRC and typically lobbies with them for the same objectives and outcomes. ACO founding members Remziya Suleyman and Kasar Abdulla were both previously on staff with TIRRC; Suleyman served as TIRRC’s policy coordinator and Abdulla served as TIRRC’s director of advocacy and education.

18. ACO (American Center for Outreach), headquartered in Nashville has its office located in the building owned by Conexion Americas called Casa Azafran.

19. When the Faith and Culture Center (FCC) was first founded, the ACO (American Center for Outreach) was a named organization in the FCC network.

20. Daoud Abudiab is the President and founder of the Faith and Culture Center.

21. In 2012, Daoud Abudiab became a TIRRC Board member and took over as Board President in 2014, continuing to serve in this capacity as of February 20, 2016.

22. “Our Muslim Neighbor” is a featured priority project of Religions for Peace, USA, an organization itself heavily weighted with organizations named in the 1991 Muslim Brotherhood Memorandum. The “Our Muslim Neighbor” project is also the sole agenda of Daoud Abudiab’s Faith and Culture Center.

23. Daoud Abudiab was a founding member of AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council) and then chaired the organization for two years.

24. Kasar Abdulla and Drost Kokoye were founding members of AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council) although all references have been scrubbed from the AMAC website but have been preserved with screen shots. Abdulla served as Secretary/Treasurer and Kokoye served as a board member. Abdulla previously had served as TIRRC’s director of advocacy and education, and Kokoye served as TIRRC’s youth representative for Muslim Achievers.

25. When the Faith and Culture Center was first founded, TIRRC was a named organization in the FCC Network.

26. AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council), headquartered in Nashville has its office located in the building owned by Conexion Americas called Casa Azafran.

27. AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council) and ACO (American Center for Outreach) were founded simultaneously by the following individuals who served on the boards of both organizations:

Danish Siddiqui, Kasar Abdulla, Soyab Malani, Sherish Siddiqui

28. When the Faith and Culture Center was first founded, AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council) was a named organization in the FCC Network.

29. Sometime during the fall of 2014, Paul “Iesa” Galloway was recruited to become the new Executive Director of ACO (American Center for Outreach). He also serves as the Executive Director of AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council).

30. In 2002, Paul “Iesa” Galloway founded the Houston chapter of CAIR and served as Executive Director until 2006.

31. CAIR, a named unindicted co-conspirator in the Holy Land Foundation terrorism financing prosecution for raising money and funneling it to HAMAS, is a founding member of the U.S. Council of Muslim Organizations and Nihad Awad, Executive Director of CAIR is a Board Member of this Council. In 1994, Nihad Awad publicly announced his support for HAMAS, a U.S. designated terrorist organization.

32. On February 1 -2, 2016, Daoud Abudiab attended the U.S. Council of Muslim Organizations conference titled First International Conference of Muslim Councils in the Westheld in Washington, D.C.

33. Maha El Genaidi, founder of ING (Islamic Networks Group) attended the U.S. Council meeting in Washington; posted messages that she spent time with Daoud Abudiab, former chair of ING affiliate, AMAC in Tennessee.

34. AMAC became a named Islamic Networks Group (ING) affiliate in 2012. AMAC’s announcement of becoming an ING affiliate said that AMAC intended to spread its reach to middle and high schools, universities, faith-based and community organizations, and other venues. We seek to educate about American Muslims and their faith as a means of promoting religious literacy, mutual respect, and understanding.

35. CAIR representatives give presentations in pubic schools and CAIR materials and here, are being used to support Common Core standards.

36. La Raza (means “the race”), lobbies for Hispanic racial preferences, bilingual education, mass immigration and amnesty for illegal aliens. La Razas commentary and position statements characterize the U.S. as a nation with widespread white racism and discrimination. The organization has opposed most of the post 9/11 U.S. counterterrorism efforts. They oppose securing the southern border, they support driver licenses for illegal immigrants, they support in-state tuition for illegal immigrant students, and they oppose cooperation on immigration law enforcement by local, state and federal authorities.

One component of La Raza’s “Excelencia in Education” initiative was a 2001 goal of creating 50 publicly funded charter schools that teach an ethnically separatist curriculum. Former La Raza president Raul Yzaguirre, Hillary Clintons Hispanic outreach advisor said, “US English is to Hispanics as the Ku Klux Klan is to blacks.

37. Daoud Abudiab, founder and President of the Faith and Culture Center (FCC) lists himself as a member of the Family of Abraham group which is also listed on the FCC website as a named organization in the Faith and Culture Network. FCC Board member, Bernard Werthan is named as a founding member of the Family of Abraham group.

38. Family of Abraham events typically involve some combination of Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious groups and individuals.

39. Religious organizations such as the US Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Lutheran Immigrant and Refugee Service, Church World Service and Episcopal Migration Ministries, among others, are federally contracted refugee resettlement organizations that work with the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement and the U.S. State Department.

40. The U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement is a primary federal agency that administrates the U.S. refugee resettlement program.

41. PNAE joined with refugee resettlement agencies and contractors International Rescue Committee (IRC), Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services (LIRS) and Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, to serve on the Steering Committee of the 2015 National Immigrant Integration Conference.

42. CAIR has publicly opposed federal and state initiatives intended to stop the resettlement of Syrian refugees. CAIR said that Alabama Gov. Bentley’s comments in his 2016 state of the state address regarding the failure of federal consultation in the resettlement of Syrian refugees, were “inflammatory” and “insensitive.”

43. ICNA Relief USA is the charity arm of the Islamic Circle of North America, an organization named in the 1991 Muslim Brotherhood Explanatory Memorandum. Rafiq Mahdi, known as the unofficial imam of the Knoxville Muslim community, is the Director Outreach Southeast Region for ICNA Relief USA. ICNA Relief maintains a refugee assistance program.

44. Memphis imam Yasir Qadhi speaks at ICNA Relief fundraisers, here and here.

45. In 2012, Memphis imam Yasir Qadhi helped launch the Memphis chapter of ACO (American Center for Outreach).

46. The Family of Abraham and the ACO (American Center for Outreach) have co-sponsored programs since 2012 and as recently as February 9, 2016.

47. Nashville transplant from Chicago, Avi Poster, is an original organizer of Family of Abraham events.

48. TIRRC’s 2010 Annual Report and their website in 2012 lists Avi Poster as a Board member.

49. Avi Poster was appointed to Megan Barrys transition committee.

50. Renata Soto, co-founder and executive director of Conexion Americas was appointed to Megan Barrys transition committee.

51. Former Haslam Economic & Community Development appointee Samar Ali, an attorney with Bone, McAllester, Norton, was appointed to Megan Barrys transition committee. (Charles Bone of the same law firm was a candidate in the same mayoral primary as Megan Barry).

52. Kasar Abdulla was a founding member of AMAC (American Muslim Advisory Council) serving as Secretary/Treasurer; she was appointed to Megan Barry’s transition committee.

53. TIRRC’s 2010 Annual Report lists Hedy Weinberg, Executive Director of TN ACLU as an Advisory Board member.

54. TIRRC’s 2010 Annual Report lists Megan Barry as an Advisory Board member.

55. In 2012, Welcoming America was awarded a grant from the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) to provide technical assistance to the refugee resettlement network of contractors across the country to help address “challenging climates.” During a 2013 Pennsylvania Refugee Conference, at which Welcoming America presented, ORR’s Director of Placement noted “three pockets of resistance against new arrivals” – New Hampshire, Georgia and Tennessee. Welcoming America has continued to receive grants from ORR and is now listed as a “Training and Technical Assistance Provider.”